10 Tips for making your OCR project succeed

(reblogged from http://www.digitisation.eu/community/blog/article/article/10-tips-for-making-your-ocr-project-succeed/)

This year in November, it has been exactly 10 years that I have been more or less involved with digital libraries and OCR. In fact, my first encounter with OCR even predates the digital library: during my student days, one of my fellow students was blind, and I was helping him out with his studies by scanning and OCR-ing the papers he needed, so their contents could be read out to him using Text2Speech software or printed on a braille display. Looking back, OCR technology has evolved significantly in many areas since then. Projects like MetaE and IMPACT have greatly improved the capabilities of OCR technology to recognize historical fonts, and open source tools such as Google’s Tesseract or those offered by the IMPACT Centre of Competence are getting closer and closer to the functionalities and success rates offered by commercial products.

Accordingly, I would like to take this opportunity to present you some thoughts and recommendations that I’ve derived from my personal experience of 10+ years with OCR processing.

A final caveat: while this is a very interesting discussion, I will not say a single word here about whether to perform OCR as an in-house activity or via out-sourcing. My general assumption is that below considerations can provide useful information for both scenarios.

1.    Know your material

The more you know about the material / collection you are aiming to OCR, the better. Some characteristics are essential for the configuration of the OCR, like e.g. the language of a document and the fonts (Antiqua, Gothic, Cyrillic, etc.) present. While such information is typically not available in library catalogues, sending documents in French language to an OCR engine configured to recognize English will yield equally poor results as trying to OCR a Gothic typeface with Antiqua settings.

Fortunately there are some helpful tools available – e.g. Apache Tika can detect the language of a document quite reliably. You may consider running such or similar characterization software in a pre-processing step to gather additional information about the content for a more fine-grained configuration of the OCR software.

Some more features in the running text the presence and frequency of which could influence your OCR setup are: tables and illustrations, paragraphs with rotated text, handwritten annotations, foldouts.

2.    Capture high quality – INPUT

Once you are ready to proceed to the image capture step it is important to think about how to set this up. While recent experiments have shown that (on simple documents) there is no apparent loss in recognition quality from using e.g. compressed JPEG images for OCR, my recommendation still remains to scan with the highest optical resolution (typically 300 or 400 ppi) and store the result in an uncompressed format like TIFF or PNG (or even the RAW data directly from the scanner).

While this may result in huge files and storage costs (btw, did you know that the cost per GB of hard drive space drop by 48% every year?), keep in mind that any form of post-processing or compression does essentially reduce the amount of information available in the image for subsequent processing – and it turns out that OCR engines are becoming more and more sophisticated in using this information (e.g. colour) to improve recognition. However, once gone, this information can never be retrieved again without rescanning. If you binarize (=convert to black-and-white) your images immediately after scanning, you won’t be able to leverage the benefits of the next-generation OCR system that requires greyscale or colour documents.

It may also be worthwhile mentioning that while this has never been made very explicit, the classifiers in many OCR engines are optimized for an optical resolution of 300 ppi, and deliver the best recognition rates with documents in that particular resolution. Only in the case of very small characters (as e.g. found on large newspaper pages) can it make sense to scale the image up to 600 ppi for better OCR results.

3.    Capture high quality – OUTPUT

OCR is still a costly process – from preparation to execution, costs can easily amount to between .5 up to .50 € per page. Thus you want to make sure that you derive the most possible value from it. Don’t be satisfied with plain text only! Nowadays some form of XML with (at least) basic structuring and most importantly positional information on the level of blocks / regions, or even better line and word or sometimes even glyph level, should always be available after OCR. ALTO is one commonly used standard for representing such information in an XML format, but also TEI or other XML-based formats can be a good choice.

Not only does the coordinate information enable greatly enhanced search and display of search results (hit term highlighting), there are also many further application scenarios such as the automated generation of table of contents, the production of eBooks, the presentation on mobile devices etc. that rely heavily on structural and layout information being available from OCR processing.

4.    Manage expectations

No matter how modern and in pristine condition your documents are, or whether you use the most advanced scanning equipment and highly configured OCR software, it is quite unrealistic to expect anything more than 90 – 95 % word accuracy from automatic processing. Most of the times though you will be happy to even come anywhere near that range.

Note that most commercial OCR engines calculate error rates based on characters and not words. This can be very misleading, since users will want to search for words. Given there are only 30 errors across a single page with 3000 characters, the character error rate (30/3000, 0,01%) seems exceptionally low. But now assume the 3000 characters boil down to only around 600 words – and the 30 erroneous characters are well distributed across different words. We arrive at an actually much higher (5x) error rate (30/600, 0,05%). To make things worse, OCR engines typically report a “confidence score” in the output. This however only means that the software believes with a certain threshold to have recognized a character or word correctly or incorrectly. These “assumptions”, despite conservative, are unfortunately often found not to be true. That is why the only possible way to derive absolutely reliable OCR accuracy scores is by the use of ground truth-driven evaluation, which is expensive and cumbersome to perform.

Obviously all of this has implications on the quality of any service based on the OCR result. These issues must be made transparent to the organization, and should in all cases also be communicated to the end user.

5.    Exploit full text to the fullest

Once you derive full text from OCR processing, it can be the first stepping stone for a wide array of further enhancements of your digital collection. Life does not stop with (even good) OCR results!

Full text gives you the ability to exploit a multitude of tools for natural language processing (NLP) on the content. Named entity recognition, topic modelling, sentiment analysis, keyword extraction etc. are just a few of the possibilities to further refine and enrich the full text.

6.    Tailor the workflow

The enemy of large-scale automated processing, it can nevertheless often be worthwhile investing some more time and tailor the OCR processing flow to the characteristics of the source material. There are highly specialized modules and engines for particular pre- and post-processing tasks, and integrating these with your workflow for a very particular subset of a collection can often yield surprising improvements in the quality of the result.

7.    Use all available resources

One of the important findings of the IMPACT project was that the use of additional language technologies can boost OCR recognition by an amount than cannot realistically be expected from even major breakthroughs in pattern recognition algorithms. Especially in dealing with historical material there is a lot of spelling variation, and it gets extremely difficult for the OCR software to correctly detect these old words. Making the OCR software aware of historical spelling by supplying it with a historical dictionary or word list can deliver dramatic improvements here. In addition, new technologies can detect valid historical spelling variants and distinguish them from common OCR errors. This makes it much quicker and easier to correct those OCR mistakes while retaining the proper historical word forms (i.e. no normalization is applied).

8.    Try out different solutions

There is a surprisingly large number of OCR software available, both freely and commercially. The Succeed project compiled information about all OCR and related software tools in a huge database that you can search here.

Also quite useful in this are the IMPACT Framework and Demonstrator Platform – these tools allow you to test different solutions for OCR and related tasks online, or even combine distinct tools into comprehensive document recognition workflows and compare those using samples of the material you have to process.

9.    Consult experts

All over the world people are applying, researching and sometimes re-inventing OCR technology. The IMPACT Centre of Competence provides a great entry point to that community. eMOP is another large OCR project currently run in the US. Consult with the community to find out about others who may have done projects similar to yours in the past and who can share findings or even technology.

Finally, consider visiting one of the main conferences in the field, such as ICDAR or ICPR and look at the relevant journal publications by IAPR etc. There is also a large community of OCR and pattern recognition experts in the Biosciences, e.g. in iDigBioHackathons like for example the ones organized by Succeed can provide you with hands-on experience with the tools and technologies being available for OCR.

10.    Consider post-correction

When all other things fail and you just can’t obtain the desired accuracy using automated processing methods, post-correction is often the only possible way to increase the quality of the text to a level suitable for scientific study and text mining. There are many solutions offered to adopt OCR post-correction, from simple-to-use crowdsourcing efforts to rather specialized tools for experts. Gamification of OCR correction has also been explored by some. And as a side effect you may also learn to interact more closely with your users and understand their needs.

With this I hope to have given you some points to take into consideration when planning your next OCR project and wish you much success in doing so. If you would like to comment on any of the points mentioned or maybe share your personal experience with an OCR project, we would be very happy to hear from you!

2 thoughts on “10 Tips for making your OCR project succeed

  1. “Great tips. Here are some expected recognition statistics based on type of the document:
    Laser printed text 98% or greater
    Machine printed text 90% or greater
    Hand printed Constrained Numbers 90% – 95% or greater
    Hand printed Constrained Alphanumeric 85% or greater
    Faxed in typed documents – 85% or greater
    Another tip, while using pdfs, prefer black & white ones instead of colored ones for higher recognition rate.”

  2. I am not an programmer but I want to study about OCR algorithm. What is the best book/ article that explain about OCR in detail (from basic to expert)? Thank you

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